Liturgical Tourism

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Peter
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Liturgical Tourism

Post by Peter » Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:55 am

As I'm spending almost the whole of June touring Europe, I thought some notes about liturgies in various countries might be of interest. I'll add more later and hope others will contribute similar thoufghts as the holday season approaches.

3rd June (Holy Trinity) - St Michael's Church, Munich, 9.00

Of the churches I had found, using the Internet before setting off, this one seemed most convenient in terms of time and location, being near the main station and comfortabley between trains. I subsequwntly found that there was one even closer at 9.30 and another not much further away at 11.00, so I was really spoilt for choice. St Michael's is a large and very ornate Baroque church, in contrast to the even vaster but much plainer cathedral a stone's thrpow away but not offering Mass at the tiem I was there.

A visiting choir sang a Mass by Gretchaninoff, interspersed with congregational hymns. The parish notices were given out by a lay person before Mass started and before that someone else told us about the Gretchaninoff setting and the visiting choir. At the end, the priest invited applause for the visitors and this, together with the spontaneous applause after the organist's closing voluntary, made it feel like a performance rather than a liturgy.


7th June (Corpus Christi) - Franciscan church, Ljubljana, 16.00

Corpus Christi is not transferred to the following Sunday in Slovenia and once again I was spoilt for choice; I opted for this one, which was even more ornate than the one in Munich. Only later did I learn that the nearby Cathedral had a procession as well, but I didn't see it.

An elderly priest officiated with a tall monk acting as server, operating the contols for the OHP that gave us the hymn texts and taking the collection. He collected from the right-hand half of the church during the Offertory hymn (acceptable enough) but collected from the left-hand half, where I was, during the Eucharistc Prayer after the Consecration and into the Lord's Prayer (not so good!).

The hymns, sounding as if they belonged to an old Sloven folk tradition, were rather half-heartedly sung, though as there was more sound from the right-hand half I wondered whether there was a little choir there or at least a cluster of regulars trying to lead them for the beneift of visitors like me.

The Kyrie, Responsorial Psalm, Alleluia (without verse), Memorial Acclamation and Agnus Dei were all sung, the Gloria, Sequence and Sanctus spoken.


10th June - Milan Cathedral, 11.00

Missalettes were available but presumably left over from a previous Mass as they were little us e for this one: not even the Repsonsorial Psalm tone corresponded to wahy was sung. The Mass was entirely in Latin apart formthe Liturgy of the Word and Intercessions. The Misallettes were headed Second Sunday after Pentecost" (clearly Corpus Christi is not transfewrred in Italy either) and the seven concelebrating priests, deacon and sub-deacon all wore red vestments."

A choir, presumably the Cathedral's own, sang a mixture of familiar plainchant and a more contrapuntal Mass setting (which I did not recognise), often mixing styles in the same item. Thus the familiar plainchant Credo had a contrapuntal introduction and concluding Et vitam venturi as well as a contrapuntal Et incarnatus inserted in the middle, the plainchant Sanctus had an additional contrapuntal Hosanna at the end and the plainchant Doxology and Great Amen was follwed by a choral Alleluia. As I arrived (a little late) the choir were singing the Asperges and during Communion they sang the traditional plainchant Ubi caritas.

The order was unusual in that the Credo came after the Intercessions with the Sign of Peace in between.

After the dismissal, the choir sang a contrapuntal Magnificat, during which the congregation srarted to leave, and an organ voluntary followed.

During Mass, visitors were walking round the Cathedral, but screened from those attending Mass, so they did not cause a distraction.

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mcb
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by mcb » Wed Jun 13, 2012 11:29 am

Peter wrote:The order was unusual in that the Credo came after the Intercessions with the Sign of Peace in between.

That's the Ambrosian Rite, isn't it?

Hare
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Hare » Wed Jun 13, 2012 12:36 pm

mcb wrote:That's the Ambrosian Rite, isn't it?


Depends if there was coffee and CUSTARD Creams afterwards :lol:

I'll get my coat :oops:

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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by docmattc » Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:38 pm

A couple of years ago I was in Darmstadt in Germany and went into Ludwigskirche. This is a circular church seating 800 with a dome and oculus like the Parthenon. Unfortunately I wasn't there for Mass to see how the incredible acoustics worked in practice. Under the dome (ie the midle of the 'nave'- the sanctuary is also circular but abutting the circumference rather than in the centre like Liverpool) I clicked my fingers quietly and heard two echos. Gently humming a note, I was completely enveloped in the sound of my own voice reflected back (not an altogether pleasant experience).

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musicus
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by musicus » Wed Jun 13, 2012 9:44 pm

This is a great idea for a topic :D
musicus - moderator, Liturgy Matters
blog

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Nick Baty
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Nick Baty » Wed Jun 13, 2012 9:45 pm

Always interesting (and educational) to see what others do. However, for many of us, it's impossible to be away on a Sunday. Any tips for midweek liturgical tourism?

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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by docmattc » Thu Jun 14, 2012 8:48 am

Clearly, I meant the pantheon, not the Parthenon. :oops:

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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Hare » Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:27 am

SATURDAY 16 JUNE - MARRIAGE CELEBRATION MASS, ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL, SOUTHWARK

Introit: Gregorian
Entrance hymn: O praise ye the Lord
Kyrie: Messe Solennelle (Vierne)
Gloria: Lourdes refrain, verses ??
Psalm: Gregorian??
Alleluia: Gregorian
Offertory: Ubi caritas (Durufle) + Blessed are you, Lord God of all creation
Sanctus: Mass VIII
Acclamation: Spoken :shock:
Agnus Dei: Messe Solennelle (Vierne)
Communion: Gregorian Antiphon + Panis Angelicus (Villette)
Recessional hymn: Tell out, my soul
Voluntary: Chorale Varie sur le Veni creator (Durufle)

Perhaps someone (Nick Gale? Haven't seen him on here for a while) can fill in the gaps.

Southern Comfort
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Southern Comfort » Mon Jun 18, 2012 1:42 pm

For contrast:


PORTSMOUTH DIOCESAN MASS IN CELEBRATION OF SIGNIFICANT WEDDING ANNIVERSARIES
SATURDAY 16 JUNE, ST BEDE'S, BASINGSTOKE


Opening Hymn: Surprised by joy no song can tell (cf. Laudate 418, but sung to ROCKINGHAM instead of MELCOMBE)

Gloria: Francis Duffy (revised, cf. Celebration Hymnal for Everyone Mass settings supplement)

Responsorial Psalm: O blessed are those who fear the Lord (Inwood, with choral arrangement for verse 3; verses sung by a couple celebrating their 25th anniversary)

Gospel Acclamation: Celtic Alleluia (with specially-written verse)

Presentation of the Gifts: Lord, your love has drawn us near (Dean, Laudate 774, with choral arrangement for verses)

Sanctus: In Pace acclamations (Walker)

Memorial Acclamation A: In Pace acclamations (Walker)

Doxology and Great Amen: plainchant

Breaking of Bread: Litany for Breaking of Bread (Inwood, Laudate 593 with verses 17-18 and 4)

Song during Communion: Live on in my love (Psallite)

Closing Hymn: When love is found and hope comes home (cf. Laudate 416, verses 1-3 and 5, but sung to JERUSALEM instead of O WALY WALY, with choral arrangement for second verse)

Recessional Voluntary: Improvised Kaleidoscopic Medley of Wedding Processional Music: Mendelssohn Wedding March — Toccata from Widor Symphony V — Karg-Elert Nun danket — Jeremiah Clarke Trumpet Voluntary — Purcell Trumpet Tune — Bach D minor Toccata — Rondo from Charpentier Te Deum — etc — etc

Congregation, cantors, organ and members of Diocesan Choir

Hare
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Hare » Mon Jun 18, 2012 3:38 pm

Hare wrote:SATURDAY 16 JUNE - MARRIAGE CELEBRATION MASS, ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL, SOUTHWARK

Introit: Gregorian
Entrance hymn: O praise ye the Lord
Kyrie: Messe Solennelle (Vierne)
Gloria: Lourdes refrain, verses ?? *
Psalm: Gregorian??
Alleluia: Gregorian
Offertory: Ubi caritas (Durufle) + Blessed are you, Lord God of all creation
Sanctus: Mass VIII
Acclamation: Spoken :shock:
Agnus Dei: Messe Solennelle (Vierne)
Communion: Gregorian Antiphon + Panis Angelicus (Villette)
Recessional hymn: Tell out, my soul
Voluntary: Chorale Varie sur le Veni creator (Durufle)

Perhaps someone (Nick Gale? Haven't seen him on here for a while) can fill in the gaps.


* Lourdes Gloria verses were by Norman Harper (Cathedral Organist)

Peter
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Peter » Tue Jun 19, 2012 10:52 am

Nick Baty wrote:Always interesting (and educational) to see what others do. However, for many of us, it's impossible to be away on a Sunday. Any tips for midweek liturgical tourism?

The obvious answer is Epiphany, Ascension or Corpus Christi in Slovenia, Italy or other countries where the feasts are not transferred! But you're a great one for planning in advance, Nick - can't you plan something that your congregation can get on with without you and go away somewhere? That's what I did and you deserve a holiday too. :)

Continuing the reports:

17th June, Faellanden, Switzerland (don't know how to produce umlauts on the computer I'm using!)

Arrived at the modern Catholic church in this village only to be directed to the nearby and much older Reformed church. The two communities had swapped churches, as the Protestants had a Confirmation service for which their church wasn't big enough. :?

The service turned out to be not Mass but Liturgy of the Word with Eucharist, which apparently happens there a lot - in that community about half the time if not more often. Where I am currently, a small town in the north of the Netherlands, it is the norm. Had I gone instead to a church just inside the boundary of Zuerich I could have had Mass, but even there one priest has to serve several communities. Clearly the shortage of priests in certain parts of the Continent is much greater than in England and they are having to take steps foreseen 40 years ago by a former PP of mine.

In the service at Faellanden there was also a baptism. The family was greeted at the start in the usual way, the baptism took place just before the intercessions and a candle was presented at the end (no formal presentation of a white garment). In between we had a Liturgy of the Word (with second reading omitted) and distribution of Communion with hymns replacing the Gloria, Responsorial Psalm, Creed :o and Sanctus, plus one after Communion. Communion was distributed with the words "This is Bread from Heaven"rather than "The Body of Christ", which also surpised me.

Apologies for the typos in the original post - I did not mean to imply there was anything slovenly about Slovene hymns. :oops:

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Nick Baty
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Nick Baty » Tue Jun 19, 2012 11:15 am

Peter wrote:The obvious answer is Epiphany, Ascension or Corpus Christi in Slovenia, Italy or other countries where the feasts are not transferred!
Alas, I'm tied to the academic calendar and these feasts usually fall in term time. :(

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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by festivaltrumpet » Tue Jun 19, 2012 5:35 pm

Peter wrote:The obvious answer is Epiphany, Ascension or Corpus Christi in Slovenia, Italy or other countries where the feasts are not transferred!


I understand that the Italian Bishops' conference has also decided to transfer feasts. The diocese of Rome celebrated Corpus Christi on Sunday 10th June. (the Vatican does not transfer feasts so Rome's bishop may not have done so)

Peter
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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Peter » Sun Jun 24, 2012 4:40 pm

Finding a Sunday Mass in rural France can be a hit-and-miss business. Yesterday I heard by word of mouth that there was Mass today at 11.00 in Carrouges, near where I am staying, and saw on a church noticeboard in Rânes, a little further away, that there was Mass at 10.30 there. This morning I opted initially for the latter but on arrival found a chalked message to the effect that there was no Mass there today but listing other options within ten miles or so, including Carrouges, so I went there instead and was pleasantly surprised by both the quality of the liturgy and the size of the congregation, even if they didn't join in the singing particularly well and included disappointingly few young people.

The priest and servers processed in carrying banners from other parishes referring to John the Baptist and by way of introduction an ancient prayer to or about him was read out. During the Penitential Act the congregation was sprinkled. A cantor sang the Responsorial Psalm with a choir providing the response; an Alleluia was sung, with spoken verse, before the Gospel and repeated after it. Two readers alternated in announcing the Intercessions, to which the response was sung. The servers carried out the Offertory procession and the collection then started, reaching me during the Preface and finishing shortly afterwards (later then ideal but better than some). The Lord’s Prayer was said without the embolism before “for the Kingdom…” and during the prayer for peace the priest and servers joined hands, though surprisingly there was no general handshake afterwards. The servers led the procession to Communion (received under one kind only) starting at the back of the church.

The choir sang the Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, Mystery of Faith and Agnus Dei with opportunities for the congregation to insert responses. Although I am not familiar with the French missal I had the impression that the Gloria was sung to the official words but with a paraphrased response and suspected some paraphrasing in the Sanctus and Mystery of Faith. Two other items were sung, again by the choir but with congregational responses: one, at the start, was about John the Baptist, while the other, after Communion, was about praise from the mouths of children and chosen because before the final dismissal a child was welcomed for baptism. As some people stayed on after Mass I presume they had the rest of the baptism service then.

During the opening, Offertory, Communion and final processions organ music was played: I guessed this was recorded even before I went up to Communion and saw no-one playing the keyboard used to accompany the choir; however, this did not jar as everything and everyone (priest, readers, choir and organ – even pages rustled as the priest tried to find the correct Preface) was heard through loudspeakers.

There was nothing I could hear or read in the notices about a Mass for Peter and Paul on Friday, though for Assumption there was a pilgrimage advertised with Mass in the morning and Evening Prayer with Benediction in the evening. While Sunday Mass at 11.00 seemed the norm at Carrouges it is not celebrated there every week: on some days another church was shown, while on others an “ADAP” was advertised, which I presumed was Liturgy of the Word with Communion – it was also the norm for the third Sunday of the month at Rânes. Presumably priests in France (and the one who said today’s Mass was far from young) as in Switzerland have to travel between churches to celebrate several Sunday Masses – another form of liturgical tourism.

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Re: Liturgical Tourism

Post by Southern Comfort » Sun Jun 24, 2012 8:48 pm

Peter wrote:The servers led the procession to Communion (received under one kind only)


This (Communion under one kind only) is standard in France, bizarre though that seems in the world's premier wine-drinking country.

Peter wrote:The choir sang the Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, Mystery of Faith and Agnus Dei with opportunities for the congregation to insert responses. Although I am not familiar with the French missal I had the impression that the Gloria was sung to the official words but with a paraphrased response and suspected some paraphrasing in the Sanctus and Mystery of Faith.


The official French text has not yet been changed according to the dictates of LA. For example, the acclamation after the consecration runs (literal translation):

We proclaim your death, Lord Jesus;
we acclaim your resurrection;
we await your return in glory.


and the Orate Fratres (Pray, brethren, that our sacrifice) goes like this:

V/ Let us pray together, at this moment of offering the sacrifice of the whole Church.
R/ For the glory of God and the salvation of the world.


Peter wrote:While Sunday Mass at 11.00 seemed the norm at Carrouges it is not celebrated there every week: on some days another church was shown, while on others an “ADAP” was advertised, which I presumed was Liturgy of the Word with Communion – it was also the norm for the third Sunday of the month at Rânes.


ADAP = Assemblée Dominicale en l'Absence de Prêtre [Sunday Assembly in the Absence of a Priest]. Some prefer to say Sunday Assembly in Anticipation of a Priest, which is rather good.

Peter wrote:Presumably priests in France (and the one who said today’s Mass was far from young) as in Switzerland have to travel between churches to celebrate several Sunday Masses – another form of liturgical tourism.


Some of them do, but the more usual pattern is one priest serving 8-10 parishes and rotating weekend celebrations between churches (except for the smallest, if they cannot hold the numbers). The people (servers, choir, etc) travel to whichever church Mass is being celebrated in. Father Circuit-Rider will not do more than two, or at the most three, Masses a weekend. Often, 1 Saturday evening — 1 Sunday morning — 1 Sunday evening will be it, at two churches only, and sometimes less than that. So you may only get Mass at your local church once a month, or once every three weeks. The way in which parishioners car-pool to get people to where Mass is being celebrated is an object lesson in community building.

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